Reminder: the ‘orans rubric’ for the Our Father still needs fixin’

What is a Rubric? From Wikipedia: A rubric is a word or section of text which is traditionally written or printed in red ink for emphasis. The word derives from the Latin: rubrica, meaning red ochre or red chalk,[1] and originates in Medieval illuminated manuscripts from the 13th century or earlier. From this comes the saying you will see now and then on coffee cups and t-shirts, “Do the Red, Say the Black”.

Actually, as this post suggests, rubrics can clarify, or obfuscate. Forgive me, but Church Regulations should work to make things clear instead of leaving us with Rubric’s Cubes to try to sort out.

In the Light of the Law

On the list of ecclesiastical matters urgently needing attention these days, the odd practicing of laity using the orans gesture during the Our Father (and in turn that gesture’s morphing into a rite of hand-holding, often aisle-filling, discombobulation) is, I grant, fairly low in priority. Nevertheless, the orans issue has come to my attention twice recently, and neither time has the author in question seemed aware of the analysis of this issue that I first offered back in 2005. My feelings aren’t hurt, it’s just that, I wonder why more people don’t look more carefully to see whether their good questions might have been treated by others elsewhere. Oh well.

Bottom-line: the rubric calling for the priest to make the orans gesture during the Our Father, a prayer now prayed with the congregants (and not on behalf of the congregants, as had been the case for more than a…

View original post 35 more words

Advertisements

Comments are fun and Educational! Comments currently are not moderated. I prefer commentators avoid the use of profanity or display overt hostility. I do not mind people arguing and putting forth their views and supporting those views. I only ask for that initial charity without which there can be no understanding.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s